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Sound Waves

Harmony

Pentatonic Scale

Chromatic Scale

Chords

Keys

Diatonic Chords

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Intervals

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Consonance

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Melody


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Chords
A group of notes that sound good together.

Here we'll take a look at three of the most common chords: Major, Minor, and Diminished. These are all known as Triads, simply a chord with three notes.

Major Chord

The Major Chord is the most common chord. Whenever you're asked to play a chord without specifying what type, then it's a Major chord. (For example, D Chord = D Major Chord).

  • Start with any note. This is the first note in the chord.
  • For the second note, count up four notes.
  • For the third note, count up three more notes.
  • The chord is named after the first note.

Click a note to see its Major Chord.

 


C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Minor Chord

The Minor Chord is similar to the Major Chord except that the second note is one lower:

  • Start with any note. This is the first note in the chord.
  • For the second note, count up three notes.
  • For the third note, count up four more notes.
  • The chord is named after the first note.

Click a note to see its Minor Chord.

 


C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Diminished Chord

The Diminished Chord is a less common chord where the third note is one lower than the Minor chord's third note.

  • Start with any note. This is the first note in the chord.
  • For the second note, count up three notes.
  • For the third note, count up three more notes.
  • The chord is named after the first note.

Click a note to see its Diminished Chord.

 


C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
0
1
2
3
4
5
6

Next Keys

Since not all notes sound good together, a song will usually use only a subset of the twelve notes. Next, we'll look at some of those subsets.

Next Section


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